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Inner city clay workers gallery 30th anniversary show

An exhibition of work by past and present members (November 2012)

I have been making flying frilled necked lizards for over 20 years, and decided that this was the work that I wanted to exhibit with clay workers.

it was a great exhibition with many past members well represented. The Inner City Clayworkers Gallery is a co-operative gallery situated on the corner of St.Johns Road and Darghan Street, Glebe,
The gallery is open Wednesday to Sunday 10.30am-5pm

 

About inner city clay workers gallery

The Inner City Clayworkers originally comprised a group of potters drawn together by a shared need for the professional interaction. They felt the isolation of their individual studios was unable to provide this and so the group began to meet regularly, on a fairly informal basis, late in 1979. The potters found that regular contact provided the opportunity for conversation and the exchange of ideas, which contributed to the artistic and technical development of individuals. Ideas about the benefits of a co-operative retail outlet, as opposed to commercial retail outlets, were discussed. It was not until the offer of a lease on a building close to member’s individual studios that the idea of a gallery was seriously considered. 20 members of the group opened the Inner City Clayworkers Gallery opened in April 1982 at 103 St Johns Road Glebe.
The gallery moved to its present location at the corner of St Johns Road and Darghan Street, Glebe in March 1983 and continues to be run on the same co-operative principals outlined by the original Clayworkers. All members participate in the management and running of the gallery.
The Inner City Clayworkers Gallery, today, is a vibrant and exciting experience, not only for its customers, but also for its members, who share the sense of ownership, pride, enjoyment and participation derived from a group venture. The gallery provides individual clayworkers with, not only the opportunity to exhibit their work, and play a part in the decision making process inherent in running a commercial venture, but the same chance for interaction that the original group sought and which helped their work to flourish.